WIKI TOPICS AND READINGS FOR GROUP STAGES
What group am I in? Which groups are assigned to which topics?


All of these Wiki topics are open-ended and they will bleed together. Start with the readings here but make the topic your own. Just as you use these topics to enhance your understanding of Joyce, use your analysis of Joyce to develop the topics. Not every group will get to tackle every topic, but I urge you to browse around and see what other groups are doing.

You are not required to read everything on the list for a given topic (and, conversely, you are welcome to read things not on this list). When you find a book that looks interesting, it's a good tactic to read the introductory chapter, and then browse around, use the index, etc. to locate specific materials that will be useful for you.

General texts for reference (on reserve):
  • Fargnoli and Gillespie, James Joyce: A-Z: The Essential Reference
  • Terence Killeen, "Ulysses" Unbound
  • Richard Ellmann, James Joyce (authoritative biography)
  • Derek Attridge (ed.), Cambridge Companion to James Joyce
  • Malcolm Bradbury and James McFarlane, Modernism: a Guide
  • James Joyce, Letters
  • Joyce, ed. Gabler, Ulysses: A Critical and Synoptic Edition (annotated critical edition of the text, in 3 volumes. Vol.1 = episodes 1-11; vol.2 = episodes 12-15; vol.3 = episodes 16-18)

Note:
CCJJ = Cambridge Companion to James Joyce
CCU = Cambridge Companion to "Ulysses"
Bedford = Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms, 3rd ed.
POTA = Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (ed. Brandon Kershner--Bedford Case Studies edition ordered for our course)




Topics:
Modernism and Modernist Culture
Gender and Sexuality
Ireland, Dublin, and Urban Culture
Narrative Form
Media and Textuality





MODERNISM AND MODERNIST CULTURE:
Explores the artistic innovations of modernism in art, literature, music, architecture, and film in the early 20th century; modernist periodical culture; the social and cultural networks in which Joyce was involved; and more! Use the index of the book to narrow down discussions of interest to you.

Modernism Page (i.e. where you post your content!)

Readings:

Recommended for first stage (obviously, later groups are also welcome to read them! But they're especially recommended for the initial "push"):
  • Bedford entries: "Modern Period"; "modernism"; "Imagism"; others depending on your interest
  • J-M Rabaté, " Joyce the Parisian" and Butler, "Joyce the Modernist," both in CCJJ
  • T.S. Eliot, "Ulysses, Order, and Myth" (D2L)—note the date of this essay (1923).
  • Chapter on Joyce from A Companion to Modernist Literature and Culture (online via PSU library)
  • Christopher Butler, Modernism: A Very Short Introduction (on reserve)
  • "The Name and Nature of Modernism," from Bradbury/McFarlane, Modernism: A Guide
  • Introduction to our edition of POTA

Recommended for later stages (obviously, the first group is also welcome to read them...you get the point):
  • Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space (on reserve—use the index and table of contents to read selectively)
  • John McCourt, Roll Away the Reel World: James Joyce and Cinema (on reserve)
  • Julian Symons, Makers of the New: The Revolution in Literature, 1912-1939 (on reserve)
  • Introduction and assorted materials from Vassiliki Kolocotroni, Modernism: An Anthology of Documents (on reserve—feel free to consult with me about recommended readings, but also browse around a bit).

Recommended for grad students: Texts identified as recommended for grad students are . . . recommended for grad students. These should add theoretical depth and density to what the entire group produces.
  • György Lukács, "The Ideology of Modernism" (D2L)
  • Susan Stanford Friedman, "Definitional Excursions" (D2L)
  • Michael North, Reading 1922 (online access via PSU library)




GENDER AND SEXUALITY:
Explores feminist and queer theory in relation to the thematic, ideological, or formal qualities of Ulysses. What historical contexts are relevant to the lives of men and women in 1900s Ireland? What forms of agency, power, and expression does the text give to (or withhold from) men and women? How are masculinity and femininity treated, and how are they given textual expression? How does the text treat questions of reproduction? How is the landscape of Ireland itself gendered? How and to what effect is the human body represented? What room does the text leave for queer desire? How does the form of the text shape or reflect its attitudes toward gender?

Gender/Sexuality Page (i.e. where you post your content!)

Readings:
Note also the "Feminist Approaches to Joyce" list of sources in POTA (316-317).

Recommended for first stage (obviously, later groups are also welcome to read them! But they're especially recommended for the initial "push"):
  • In CCJJ: Johnson, “Joyce and Feminism,” and Valente, "Joyce and Sexuality"
  • Bedford entries on "gender," "gender criticism," "queer theory"; others?
  • In POTA: introduction to feminist criticism (299-307); Suzette Henke's essay (327-36).

Recommended for later stages (obviously, the first group is also welcome to read them...you get the point):
  • Vike Martina Plock, "Bodies," in CCU
  • Joe Valente, The Myth of Manliness in Irish National Culture (on reserve)

Recommended for grad students: Texts identified as recommended for grad students are . . . recommended for grad students. These should add theoretical depth and density to what the entire group produces.
  • C. Froula, Modernism's Body (reserve);
  • K. Mullin, James Joyce, Sexuality, and Social Purity (reserve);
  • R. Pearce (ed.), Molly Blooms: A Polylogue (on reserve);
  • J. Kristeva, "Joyce the Gracehoper" (in James Joyce: The Augmented Ninth, on reserve)





NARRATIVE FORM:
Ulysses experiments with different uses of language and form to convey the novel's events, the internal thoughts of a character, each character's relationships to other characters and to the larger social fabric, etc. The novel contains many shifts of form, perspective, narrative style, etc, and we have a range of critical tools at our disposal for thinking about the qualities of narration, voice, temporality, allusion and intertextuality, use of dialogue/monologue/stream of consciousness, the use of non-prose formats, etc. as they shape the form of Ulysses.

Narrative Page (i.e. where you post your content!)

Recommended for first stage (obviously, later groups are also welcome to read them! But they're especially recommended for the initial "push"):
  • Culler essay on narrative in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction (D2L)
  • Bedford entries: "intertextuality," "narrative," "narratology," "interior monologue," "plot," "free indirect discourse," and others depending on your interests.
  • Purdue Narratology glossary
  • Brandon Kershner, "Intertextuality," in CCU
  • Dorrit Cohn, Transparent Minds (reserve)

Recommended for later stages (obviously, the first group is also welcome to read them...you get the point):
  • Barthes, "From Work to Text" (D2L)
  • Hollington, "Svevo, Joyce, and Modernist Time," in Modernism: A Guide (on reserve)

Recommended for grad students: Texts identified as recommended for grad students are . . . recommended for grad students. These should add theoretical depth and density to what the entire group produces.
  • Garrett Stewart, "Joyce's 'Modality of the Audible,'" in Reading Voices (on reserve);
  • Paul Saint-Amour, chapter from Tense Future (D2L);
  • Caroline Levine, chapter from Forms (D2L).
  • Leo Bersani, "Against Ulysses" (D2L)
  • If you're looking for more, you might also take a look at the Ricoeur essay listed under "Media and Textuality" -- this could fit in either category.




IRELAND, DUBLIN, AND URBAN CULTURE:
Explores Joyce's thinking about Irish history and politics, including issues of nation (social class, religion, parliamentary politics, Irish independence, Parnell, the British Empire, etc.), or issues specific to the Dublin metropolis (urban space, traffic, noise, infrastructure, transportation, etc.).

Ireland/Dublin/Urban Page (i.e. where you go to post your content!)

Readings:
Recommended for first stage (obviously, later groups are also welcome to read them! But they're especially recommended for the initial "push"):
  • Bedford: "historicism"; "new historicism," "postcolonial lit/theory," "cultural criticism"; "Celtic Revival"…others?
  • In CCJJ: Deane, "Joyce the Irishman"; Howes, "Joyce, colonialism and nationalism"
  • In CCU: Enda Duffy, "Setting: Dublin 1904/1922";
  • James Joyce, "Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages" (1907)
  • Bradbury, "The Cities of Modernism," from Modernism: a Guide (on reserve)
  • POTA: essays on cultural criticism & postcolonial criticism; "Cultural Documents and Illustrations"

Recommended for later stages (obviously, the first group is also welcome to read them...you get the point):
  • Brandon Kershner, The Culture of Joyce's "Ulysses" (on reserve)
  • In CCU: Michael Rubenstein, "City Circuits"

Recommended for grad students: Texts identified as recommended for grad students are . . . recommended for grad students. These should add theoretical depth and density to what the entire group produces.
  • Cheryl Herr, Joyce's Anatomy of Culture (on reserve);
  • Rubenstein, Public Works (reserve);
  • Raymond Williams on modernism and metropolitan perception (D2L);
  • Walter Benjamin, "Paris, Capital of the Nineteenth Century" (D2L);
  • Michel de Certeau, "Walking in the City" (D2L)
  • Guy Debord, "Theory of the Dérive" (D2L)





MEDIA AND TEXTUALITY:
Joyce's novel asks us to ask to reconsider the material, technological, and practical elements of what text is, how text hits the page, how text produces meaning, and the work that different texts and media forms do in our world. This topic will examine print technologies (printing presses, news presses, etc.); communication media (phonographs, telegrams, letters, films, radios, propaganda, ads, etc.); theory about oral vs. written communication; digital approaches to Joyce; and/or the print history of Ulysses.

This may be the most open-ended topic—and/or the one that involves the most reading. You aren't required to read all of the readings below (though I won't stop you!); I have listed more readings because the topic is more obscure.

Media/Textuality Page (i.e. where you go to post your content!)

Readings:
Recommended for first stage (obviously, later groups are also welcome to read them! But they're especially recommended for the initial "push"):
  • Bedford entries on "text"; "textual criticism"; "literacy"; "media studies"
  • Gabler, ‘‘Joyce’s Text in Progress’’ in CCJJ;
  • R. Williams, "Media" and "Mediation" (D2L)
  • David Trotter, "Stereoscopy" (D2L)

Recommended for later stages (obviously, the first group is also welcome to read them...you get the point):
  • "Joyce's Noises" (on D2L--a series of three articles on Joyce and media; also maybe helpful context for podcasts?)
  • McLuhan, intro from Understanding Media (on reserve)
  • Smith, "How a Great Daily Organ Is Turned out" (D2L)
  • Barthes, "The Grain of the Voice" (D2L)
  • Creasy, "Manuscripts & Misquotations" (D2L);

Recommended for grad students: Texts identified as recommended for grad students are . . . recommended for grad students. These should add theoretical depth and density to what the entire group produces.
  • Jerome McGann, The Textual Condition (on reserve—see esp. chapter called "How to Read a Book");
  • Jessica Pressman, Digital Modernism (on reserve--esp. ch. 4);
  • Paul Ricoeur, "What is a Text?" (D2L);
  • Hugh Kenner, The Mechanic Muse (on reserve);
  • Paul Saint-Amour, "Ulysses Pianola" (on D2L)