Here musicality plays a strong role in the chapter: language begins to take on an agency of its own. Joyce tells us the events of the story through a sort of filter; we see the events blurred by the musicality of the language. It is important to note that it is the musical quality of language that is emphasized over the actual meaning of the words. One choice example:


Jingle a tinkle jaunted.
Bloom heard a jing, a little sound. He’s off. Light sob of breath Bloom sighed on the silent bluehued flowers. Jingling. He’s gone. Jingle. Hear. (11.456-458)


What is interesting about this passage is the way that musicality blurs the words’ actual meaning (what is a “jing,” exactly…? Anyone…? *crickets*). Yet at the same time, the passage is completely intelligible. Written in prosy, (non-musical) language, we know this: there was a jingling sound that continues; Bloom sighs, reflects that he’s gone.
But that is not all that goes on here. Somehow--it is difficult to explain how, exactly--this musicality, this blurring of the sound and meaning of the words, affects the emotional register of the passage. It is sad. Wistful. The phrases “he’s off,” and “he’s gone” imply leaving, an absence; “bluehued” and “sob of breath” also imply sadness. Somehow this is mixed with the repetition of “jingling,” typically something bright and cheerful sounding, to create a sort of “bitter sweet” mood that is difficult to fully explain, and, I would argue, untranslatable.
The musical rhythm of the passage is also illuminating: one can do a scansion on it, as one would do for poetry, and see a couple of interesting patterns develop.

(NOTE: the formatting for the scansion got messed up when I saved the page. Please trust that the scansion pattern below is more or less on point)

‘ ‘ _ ‘ _ ‘ _ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ _ ‘ ‘ ‘ _
Bloom heard a jing, a little sound. He’s off. Light sob of breath Bloom sighed on


_ ‘ _ ‘ _ ‘ _ ‘ _ ‘ ‘ ‘ _ ‘
the silent bluehued flowers. Jingling. He’s gone. Jingle. Hear. (11.456-458)

The passage features a series of iambic feet that are periodically broken by strong, stressed syllables. These usually occur on places where Bloom’s thoughts are forcing their way into the “musicality” of the passage (“He’s off;” “Bloom sighed;” “He’s gone”). Taken as a whole, this is one example of Joyce allowing the “musical” quality of language to carry the emotional and dramatic weight of the scene. It does not obliterate the words’ meanings; rather, it creates a new path to understanding that is less logical and more intuitive; in other words, we may not consciously be able to grasp why it means what it does, or how we can “understand” it fully, but that may be the point: the way that textuality can graft meaning and communicate to the reader outside of normal narrative discourse.